Emergency financial assistance for musicians

Both of the new videos were made against countless odds: “In the 1970s” because of all the impossible ideas we wanted to make real, and “Felicity” because we had to find a place to shoot all 15 Baccis at the same time with essentially no budget. Thankfully due to my employment at Roulette Intermedium in Brooklyn, I was able to get a day there to shoot, and Chris Shields, a filmmaker/writer/musician who I’ve admired for years, was completely instrumental in making that video work as well as it did, considering that we filmed it in six hours by the skin of our teeth. It was Chris’ natural eye for dynamism and lighting that made it look so amazing, as well as the insane post-production he did which made it look like an old VHS copy of an Italian movie. My dream came true!

Pre- and post-choruses were a little less aggressive this year, even while variations on these chorus-abutting sections saw an increase. Interestingly, only “The Middle” dispensed with any intro material this year, and only Eminem’s “Killshot” got into the Top 5 without any chorus or refrain material, but I mean, he did say right at the start of the song that he wasn’t gonna repeat himself, so there you have it. (And yes, I said “chorus-abutting sections” back there, and yes, I had Morgan Freeman’s voice in my head when I said it … “chorus-abutting sections.“)

We love that Project Sonata’s pitch video is highly informative and makes learning about this strange Japanese synth-voice program, and the global culture around it, interesting and fun. Both the organization’s and the campaign’s message empower female electronic music creators and people who suffer from clinical depression, bipolar disorder, and other mental health issues through the limitless palette of UTAU.

Creative rapper names

In Soundfly’s new course, The Art of Hip-Hop Production, you’ll learn the nuances of producing beats, arranging tracks, and creative sampling techniques.

Much like vinyl imparts a certain imperfect-but-adored sound through time, dust collected, faulty needles, and warped records, the same can be said of the MP3. Arguably, retro-MP3 production value is more in line with the tenor of our digital, postmodern age. We now have free apps on our phone to imitate crappy VHS camcorders. We share dank Instagram content that harnesses the style of visual degradation, mash-up and retro Windows ’98 artifacts — why not bring back the 128 kbps MP3 as well?

Once you start regularly checking in on your streaming data, you’ll be able to make more informed decisions about different aspects of your music career, such as:

In the above video, you can watch me put together a quick trap beat and then create some simple variations on it. Subtle changes in the foundational loop or beat will help your song to feel like it’s moving forward as the song progresses, even though the track might only be built on a couple of repetitive looping fragments, just like so much of hip-hop production is.

Cui reiterates the results of the probe tone experiments and explains that “Tones that fit well often are also easier to process.” Not only do the tonic tones fit the best, they help our brain process all of the information faster.

Early 2000s rappers

“God’s Plan”: Man, the chords in this loop were hard to identify. Not only because the notes here don’t conform to standard A-440 tuning (it’s all about 20 cents sharp of G major), but because they start out as ninth chords whose upper halves are louder and more timbre-distinct than their lower, arpeggio-happy halves. It’s almost like it’s better explained not as “9-chords,” but as “an Em stacked on top of an Am,” and then “a D chord stacked on a G chord.” This “separation” thinking is enhanced by the low-muffled organ patch playing the Am and G, and the more trebly organ patch playing the Em and D.

The ability to move up and down the neck of a guitar and understand what your available notes are in any given fret, is something that many guitarists struggle with well into their careers. It takes an effort to commit oneself to learning where all of the notes are and the patterns they create, but that doesn’t mean it has to be difficult to pick up this skill.

A narrative takes it further, beyond the facts into something that pulls fans on a more emotional level. It’s how you got to where you are, the struggles you’ve faced, how you’ve overcome those struggles, and where you’re going.

Funnily, his music also set off debates across Europe about the new “trend” towards effeminate, sentimental, and “cowardly” music! Despite its popularity, people were worried composers were taking the modern opera in feminine directions. And perhaps to make matters worse, Queen Marie Antoinette rather loved his work and invited him to Paris to compose for the Academie Royale de Musique. We won’t go into the competitive “compose off” between he and Christof Gluck, but it is rather humorous that he had half of Paris up in arms about whether they’d support his music or his rival’s and declare themselves as either a Piccinnist or a Gluckist.

+ Pursue your dreams faster with a Soundfly Mentor! Share your musical goals with us and we’ll pair you up with a professional musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran who will help you achieve them in a customized four-week session.